Wednesday 02 November, 2016

Review: Nomad Outland Whiskey

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These are interesting times for Scotch drinkers, to say the least. Wonsaponatime (as John Lennon would say), the choice was fairly straightforward between the five regions/styles, or different blends produced roughly the same way. Now, there are so many variations not so much in distillation but in aging and finishing that one could lose count […]




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These are interesting times for Scotch drinkers, to say the least. Wonsaponatime (as John Lennon would say), the choice was fairly straightforward between the five regions/styles, or different blends produced roughly the same way. Now, there are so many variations not so much in distillation but in aging and finishing that one could lose count of the expressions.

Of particular popularity is topping the typical ex-bourbon barrel aging process in sherry casks, lending some sweetness and advanced mellowness. So it stands to reason that someone would extenuate that concept.

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Nomad Outland Whisky is an oddball by its very nature: it starts as a Speyside blend of malt and grain whiskies, aged a minimum of four (thought they also claim 5-8) years in American oak in the Highlands before being shipped to Jerez, Spain, where it is re-casked  into Pedro Jimenez barrels and put up in the Gonzalez Byass cellars for 12 months.

No surprise, Nomad shows a healthy golden amber color, deeper than you’d expect for a Scotch of even 8 years. On the nose, sherry notes certainly dominate: figs, raisins butter. On the palate, it shows as a true hybrid, with butter, wood and white pepper balanced by raisins, prunes, vanilla and honey. While it doesn’t have the richness of an actual Pedro Jimenez, the level of sweetness (a healthy 12g/litre) might let you mistake it for a liqueur if not for the alcohol heat (41.3% abv, to be exact).

The appeal here is doubtfully intended toward a typical Scotch drinker (unless he or she is already pre-disposed to Drambuie). I think it’s more likely to appeal to the anejo rum fan, cognac sipper or even bourbon drinker open to something different. Novices intimidated by standard Scottish whisky also might accept this as a stepping stone.

I’m enjoying it—it softens up nicely over an ice cube, and would probably make an amazing Crusta—but I can’t say I think every cask spirit aficionado will. See for yourself.

More about Nomad Outland Whiskey


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